Courses of year 2012


UltraWideBand and Cognitive Radios

Lecturer: Jocelyn Fiorina, Département Télécommunications, SUPELEC

Schedule:

  • April 16th, 15:00-17:00 (room FA-2C)
  • April 18th,  9:00-11:00 (room FA-0A (Multimedia Lab)) 
  • April 18th, 11:00-13:00 (meeting room of the DII, first floor)
  • April 20th, 10:00-12:00 (room FA-2C)
  • April 20th, 14:00-16:00 (room FA-0A (Multimedia Lab))
  • April 23rd, 9:00-13:00 (room FA-0A (Multimedia Lab))

Program:
Lectures on UWB as underlay technology for cognitive radio.  Description of the characteristics and particularities of Time  Hopping Impulse Radio UWB signals. Description of  cognitive radio concept as a solution for a better use of  spectrum resources. Inclusion of UWB as underlay technology  in cognitive radio. Study of the performance of UWB systems  and characterization of the multi user interferences. Design of  receivers in non-Gaussian interferences. Description of alternative signaling schemes (MB-OFDM, DS-CDMA, Time  Reversal combined with UWB).

Exam:
Not yet defined

CFD: 5


RF microphone for cochlear implant application

Lecturer:  Prof.Gilles Jacquemod, Polytech'NiceSophia – UNS, Plateforme Conception CIM-PACA

Schedule:

  • July 9th: 14:30-17:30 (FA1D)
  • July 10th: 9:00-12:00 and 14:00-16:00 (FA1C)
  • July 11th: 9:00-12:00 and 15:00-17:00 (FA1C)
  • July 12th: 14:00-16:00 (exam) (FA1D)

Program:

Exam:
Not yet defined

CFD: 5


Network Coding

Lecturer: Muriel Médard, Full Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT. Instructor’s web page: http://www.mit.edu/~medard/

Schedule:

  • May 28th: 9:00-12:00 (room FA1C) and 14:00-17:00 (room FA1F)
  • May 29th: 9:00-12:00 (room FA0D) and 14:00-17:00 (room FA1B)
  • May 30th: 9:00-12:00 (room FA1C)

Program:

Network coding is a new area of networking, in which data is manipulated inside the network to increase throughput, reduce delay, and improve robustness. This field has recently found commercial applications in content distribution, peer-to-peer design, and enabling high-throughput wireless networks.

The goal of this class is to provide participants with the theoretical and practical tools necessary not only to understand the field of network coding, but also to conduct independent, innovative work in the area. The curriculum reflects this mixture of theoretical foundations and practical approaches.

The first part of the course focuses on the algebraic principles underlying network coding. These principles do not require prior knowledge of advanced algebra or optimization.

The second part of the course discusses the role of network coding in improving throughput and reliability. It introduces distributed random network coding and discusses its applications. We formalize the problem of minimizing transmission cost and solve it in a distributed manner for both wireline and wireless systems. We explain the connection between this approach and traditional routing and ARQ. We also discuss example applications including data dissemination in peer-to-peer systems, high throughput wireless networks, and reliability and coverage in wireless networks.

The third part of the class discusses the use of network coding for compression. We explain the theoretical and practical connections between distributed random network coding and distributed compression. We also present a practical application of network coding for compressing correlated sensor data as they are transmitted toward the collection point.

The fourth part of the course discusses the security aspect of network coding. We discuss the use of network coding for detecting and correcting data corruption in wireless systems. We also present network-coding-based data verification in peer-to-peer systems.

Finally, we provide a broad overview of different areas of research and innovation in network coding and its applications.

Exam:
Not yet defined

CFD: 5


Data Management for Mobile Users

Lecturer: Sergio Ilarri, University of Zaragoza (Spain)

Schedule:

  • July 23th: room FA1A 14.30-18.30
  • July 24th: room FA1A 14.30-18.30
  • July 25th: room FA0A (multimedia lab) 14.30-18.30
  • July 26th: room FA1A 14.30-18.30
  • July 27th: room FA1A 11.00-13.00 (exam)

Program:

  • Technological context: mobile environments. First of all, we will describe the technological context (mobile infrastructure and mobile devices) that we will consider along the course. We will explain some difficulties that this scenario introduces for data management and present several data access models that can be adopted (push-based, pull-based, and hybrid). 
  • Agents and mobile agents. Then, we will present the concept of software agent as an abstraction that can help in the development of certain systems. We will describe the features of agents and their potential benefits. Specifically, due to their advantages for mobile computing, we will emphasize the case of mobile agents, which are agents that have the ability to move from one computer/device to another. We will also present the features of some existing mobile agent platforms such as SPRINGS.
  • Location-Based Services. In this part of the course we will focus on a type of mobile data service that has received considerable attention: Location-Based Services (LBS) are services that offer the user information that is relevant for his/her current location. We will discuss several examples of LBS and present location-dependent queries as a basic building block to develop LBS.
  • Data management in vehicular networks. In this part, we will consider a mobile computing scenario composed by vehicles that dynamically build an ad hoc wireless network to exchange information. We will motivate the interest of these vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) within the context of Intelligent Transportation Systems. We will discuss about the challenges, techniques, applications, existing systems, and future trends.
  • Examples of systems and other related technologies. Finally, in this last part of the course, we will illustrate some other examples of data services for mobile computing and briefly present some related technologies (data streams). Along with the presentations, we will perform some exercises in the lab, that will help us to familiarize with the basic concepts of mobile agents.  

Exam:
Not yet defined

CFD: 5


Functional and Concurrent Programming in Erlang

Lecturer: Wojciech Turek, PhD, Department of Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology

Schedule:

  • September 3rd, 10:00-13:00 and 15:00-17:00
  • September 4th, 10:00-13:00 and 15:00-17:00
  • September 5th,10:00-13:00 and 15:00-17:00 

Program:
Basic concepts and paradigms of programming, functional programming assumptions, the mechanisms used in functional languages, functional languages extensions. Erlang overview: history, aims, main concepts and applications. Erlang basics: simple types, operators, complex types, variables, pattern matching, functions and modules, built-in functions, conditional statements, guards, recursion, tail calls, lists comprehensions, records, higher order functions. Models of concurrent computation, the model of actors and message exchange, Erlang processes, interprocess communication mechanisms, process registry, joining processes, error handling.

Exam:
Not yet defined

CFD: 5